Newest Recipes

THE PUREST, MOST TRADITIONAL SUSHI IN THE WORLD

Using fish that I catch myself – carp, bluegill, large mouth, pickerel and trout sashimi 

For the last few years, the Japanese government has been awarding “pure” Japanese restaurants, in foreign countries, a Japanese government seal of approval. In the spirit of this great award, I imagined sushi at its genesis, along the Yangtze River in China, where rice was first cultivated, when sushi wasn’t called sushi and when rice itself had not even reached Japan.

Thousands of years ago freshwater fish caught in rivers by the rice paddies were packed in rice and salt as a method of preservation; variations of this type of sushi are still popularly prepared in South East Asia. The fermentation of the fish causes the breakdown of amino acids; this leads to a richness of flavor much like the fabulously stinky cheese, Epoisses. I serve this on a toasted homemade rice flour baguette and chives. I also like to serve this with sliced fresh pear. Funny thing is, however hard I try, nothing that I intend to make traditional remains that way.

I use freshwater fish to tip my hat to the freshwater origins of sushi. In order to alleviate the possibility of parasitic infection the fish is always frozen first. I have never created a more interesting or satisfying raw fish experience.

KILGORE TROUT

Hickory smoked wild rainbow trout, sun dried mulberries, white walnuts, string beans, and squash rolled up in a mixture of wild rose and sassafras scented wild rice and organic corn. do not dip in soy sauce. dip into fresh horseradish, wild celery and wild cherry infused maple syrup soy vinegar

*We do not accept money for this roll. We accept wampum (sea shells used as currency by the Iroquois). This is our Native American roll which incorporates, what used to be, staple foods of the Indians of the Eastern Woodlands.

Trevor Corson

THE SECRET LIFE OF TREVOR

a roll of steamed lobster meat, fresh ginger, scallions and lemongrass that is topped with thin sliced seared organic grass fed filet mignon and drizzled with a ginger garlic sake sauvignon blanc roasted sesame soy

The lobster population is at an all-time high off the coast of Maine, so I wanted to introduce New England’s favorite crustacean to our newest menu. For inspiration, I asked Trevor Corson, the bestselling author of THE SECRET LIFE OF LOBSTERS – which is the most important book on lobster love making ever written – what lobstermen like to eat? This was his reply: “Most lobstermen I know like to eat steak, what can I say? But they do eat lobster with pride, from time to time, too, of course.” The Secret Life of Trevor combines two great tastes that taste great together as one: steak and lobster!

LOUISIANA VOODOO

a roll of dirty rice made with ground nutria liver, heart, and blood
stuffed with fried soft-shell crawdad, okra and black eyed peas

Nutria, a giant herbivorous rodent, have a devastating effect on Louisiana’s coastal wetlands and are among the top one hundred most destructive invasive species in the world.

CARPE DIEM

steamed carp sushi topped with wilted scallions and a sauce of ginger, garlic, pinot grigio and homemade carp garum (roman fish sauce)

A Roman inspired recipe created in honor of Horace, the great Augustan poet who made famous the idea that one should enjoy one’s wine today and not wait for a brief and unsure future. Asian carp is a highly destructive invasive species that Americans should acquire a taste for. Delicate fleshed, it is best steamed or pickled.

CREAM OF GREEN TOMATO

pureed roasted tomato hornworm, roasted garlic, green onion, fennel, green pepper, dill, cashew, champagne, cream and butter

Over a billion pounds or pesticides were applied in the United States and over 5.6 billion pounds were applied worldwide last year. This is the first recipe that I have created for our Agricultural Pest Menu. Why not eat the pests that destroy our crops rather than pump highly toxic chemicals into our ecosystem?

SECRET ON THE VINE 

a dozen spices, herbs, and sunflower, honey sweetened cabernet sake. slowly simmered and served warm

Named after and inspired by my co-conspirator Gabriel Cruz’ (aka Pierre Bourgeois) newest song, which is about the intoxicating force that animates the universe and inspires humanity to eat, drink, make love, and create. Designed to be shared among groups of friends and lovers; served in a bountiful communal cup made by co-conspirator and sculptor Sean Peterson. “You can listen to his songs and learn how to live” is what Bob Dylan said about Woodie Guthrie. This is what Pierre’s music does to me. This is what Sean Peterson’s sculpture does to me. People like them elevate eating and drinking to a spiritual experience. Music is sacred. All of art is sacred, and eating and drinking are too. This combines and ritualizes three sacred cosmic arts; music, eating (and drinking) and sculpture.